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The problem with Adèle and Emma’s relationship is that the lovers are unequal. Emma has had a long line of girlfriends and is poised for success as a painter, while Adèle pursues a quiet career as a teacher of small children and seems increasingly scared that she’s out of Emma’s league. It’s a valid fear. At times, Seydoux makes Emma an enigma — her art comes first. She has a lot riding on the relationship, but not, like Adèle, her very identity.

People who’ve been emotionally brutalized by long relationships should approach Blue is the Warmest Color with care. It’s potent. It might open old wounds. It might show you wounds you didn’t know you had.

David Edelstein review of Blue is the Warmest Color (via alexithymia-daily)

(Source: alexithymiadaily, via kingofdespair)